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FINDING YOUR


FIT


COLLEGEOR UNIVERSITY


NATA EW BY CAITLIN BURNS • ARCADIA UNIVERSITY


The decision to transfer can be challenging, with concerns about credits, friends, housing, and course loads. But it doesn’t have to be! Below is advice from students and graduates of Arcadia University who have found success after making the decision to transfer. They each have different backgrounds, interests, and stories, but they can all agree on one thing: fi nding a college that truly fi ts you, your needs, and your goals is important to any transfer journey.


Dorianne Feinstein As an Arcadia Class of 2018 graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Theater with a minor in Music, Dori


said fi nding her fi t came down to three things: credits, location, and environment.


Dori, who transferred to Arcadia


from Susquehanna University, want- ed a school that accepted her credits, had a welcoming environment, and was near a city with theater opportu- nities. Choosing a school near Phil- adelphia provided what she was looking for. In hindsight, she can see how transferring gave her the chance to network with production


companies and eventually apply for apprenticeships. Within the campus community, Dori opened herself up to the op- portunities available. She wrote for the University’s blog, participated in University- and student-run theater programs, worked at the Offi ce of Career Education, and hosted pro- spective students for the University’s OverKnight program. “I’m glad I did transfer, but there were challenges,” Dori said. “I had to fi nd what I needed to personally grow.”


Her advice to other students think- ing about transferring? Have patience and don’t give up, even when you don’t think things will work in your favor.


“It might seem easier to drop a minor or change a major, but if you’re


transfer.collegexpress.com  2021 10


passionate about something, don’t be scared,” Dori said. “Use resources at both schools as much as possible, and don’t let opportunities pass you by.”


Aliyah Abraham


As a single par- ent, Aliyah, a Class of 2018 graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration and a minor in


Pan-African Studies, was looking for a school that was close to home but would also challenge her to grow. After going to Montgomery County Community College, Aliyah was en- couraged by her advisor to meet with Dr. Doreen Loury, assistant professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at Arcadia. However, their paths didn’t cross until after Aliyah had accepted the offer to attend the University.


“I [transferred] on a whim,” Aliyah said. “However, [it] enabled me to have a quality education and be close to my son as well as offered me a community that embraced me as a single parent.”


Don’t be afraid to get involved, and don’t let your age or the different stages of life hold you back from enjoying your opportunity. — ALIYAH ABRAHAM


Aliyah has also made an impact on campus. As a transfer student, she found there was a need more Black student organizations and pro- gramming. She founded Melanin in Action, a community service–driven organization that focuses on impact- ing Black lives. Through Melanin in


@CollegeXpress


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