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Action, Aliyah organized a drive for Hurricane Maria victims, developed the collaborative “Breaking the Si- lence” event that initiated a dialogue about race and led to positive changes on campus, and brought the need for a campus food pantry to the fore- front. Now she is a founding mem- ber and president of Arcadia Univer- sity’s fi rst Black Alumni Association. “I never meant to get involved,


but I learned things about myself by doing so,” Aliyah said. “Don’t be afraid to get involved, and don’t let your age or the different stages of life hold you back from enjoying your opportunity.”


Ryan Adalbert Ryan, a Class of 2016 graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, didn’t fi nd his fi t the fi rst time he transferred. After meeting with an advisor at his new college on the fi rst day, Ryan learned that many of the credits he had earned at Bucks County Com- munity College wouldn’t be accepted at his new school. That afternoon, he called Arcadia University to discuss his credits and fi nd out if his offer of acceptance was still open. Three days later, he was an Arcadia Knight. “The #1 thing I was looking for was that the transfer process was going to go smoothly,” he said. “No one wants to fi nd out they need to take another year for a path they’re already on. [I wanted] a good, seam- less transfer experience, and that’s what I got in the end.” Ryan said while he didn’t have time for extracurriculars since he worked 30 hours a week to support his family, the internship experiences he found at his transfer school helped him de- velop connections with classmates


and advance in his career as a pro- grammer—fi rst to part-time work while he completed his degree, and then full-time work after graduation. He gives credit for his successful start to his computer science and mathe- matics professor Ned Wolff, who helped him secure the internship. “I think about the fact that if I had stayed at my fi rst transfer school, I’d still be in college,” Ryan said. “The best advice I can give is all the work pays off. It’s an investment in your future, and I am reaping the benefi ts of it now.”


Jessica Braun


A member of the Class of 2016 who now is a Doctor of Physical Ther- apy (DPT) stu- dent, Jessica


was looking to her future when she decided to transfer.


After receiving her associate de- gree from Sussex County Community College, Jessica was looking for a school that could support her on the physical therapy career path. Arcadia offered opportunities for Jessica to build a relationship with the school and transition into its DPT program upon acceptance.


“I wanted to do physical therapy,


The best advice I can give is all the work pays off. — RYAN ADALBERT


and Arcadia offered more opportuni- ties for undergraduate students to enter the DPT program,” she said. “It just seemed like the undergraduate and graduate experience at the Uni- versity would be benefi cial to me with my background.” Jessica said she was nervous about transferring because of the living and social arrangements—she had never lived on her own and feared not being able to make friends easily. However, becoming involved with campus activities allowed her to con- nect with classmates. As a physical therapist in training, she said the skills she learned in those extracurriculars have helped her transition into graduate school effectively and pro-


transfer.collegexpress.com  2021 11


vided a better patient experience. “A lot of my leadership positions required me to speak with people I didn’t know, which has helped me work with physical therapy patients,” said Jessica, citing an example of when she was president of the Envi- ronmental Network and the group wanted to reduce the amount of paper wasted on campus. As part of that process, she spoke with administra- tion, faculty, and students to develop a solution. “I learned a lot about how to talk to people and connect with them,” she said.


Alexander Lorenz


A small school with a beauti- ful campus was what Comput- er Science stu- dent Alexander Lorenz, a se-


nior at Arcadia, was looking for in a transfer institution. While searching for colleges, Alex-


ander was satisfi ed that Arcadia would meet his needs. After speaking with a transfer advisor, he felt confi dent that the school would accept the credits he had earned at Bucks County Community College. “Something you don’t think about when looking at campus environment is residence life,” Alexander said. “I would advise transfer students to visit the residence halls of their prospective school(s) and make sure the environ- ment fi ts you.”


Alex wanted to live on campus, but he was anxious because he’d never lived on his own. However, with the help of the Gaming Club, he made friends and found it easy to adjust.


“Find something that you like and


fi nd an organization that focuses on that interest,” he said. “It’s easy to meet people when you have a com- mon interest.”


Caitlin Burns is the Press and Media Manager, University Relations at Arcadia University in Glenside, Pennsylvania.


@CollegeXpress


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