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What Do Colleges Look for in a


Transfer W


hen it comes to col- lege, the path you travel to earn a de- gree may look differ- ent than that of oth-


er students with the same goal. That’s because some will start at one uni- versity and stay until they earn their degree, while others may transfer from one school to another at some point in their college career. The road to a bachelor’s degree can also begin at a community college with the plan to transfer to a four-year school to fi nish up your studies.


If you happen to fall into the sec- ond or third category, you might be wondering what colleges look for in a transfer applicant. While each ad- mission department will have spe- cifi c criteria unique to that college or university, there are some general guidelines you can follow in order to put yourself in the best possible light with admission committees.


Previous and current college performance


“One of the most important factors in a transfer student’s application is their academic performance at their previous college or university,” ex- plains Jill deRosas, Assistant Director for Transfer Recruitment at Tulane University in New Orleans. It’s help- ful to have some core classes on your transcript, such as English compo- sition or college writing, as well as higher-level mathematics courses like calculus or statistics. Since these core classes are typically required for most bachelor’s degrees, it’s in your best interest to have these credits before transferring to a new school. At most universities, deRosas says, transfer students are evaluated based primarily on college academic suc- cess and experience as opposed to grades or standardized tests from high school. She does point out that many colleges still require a fi nal high


transfer.collegexpress.com  2021 12 Applicant? BY SARA LINDBERG


school transcript and standardized test scores as part of the application process. However, they are not re- viewed as heavily as they are with traditional undergraduates. Demon- strating academic success in college is paramount to the transfer process.


Classes that match up It’s always safer to choose courses that are likely to transfer to the university you want to attend. “Transfer stu- dents go through a matriculation pro- cess to determine how their credits transfer to the college,” explains Taggart Archibald, Director of Admis- sions in the Engagement Offi ce of Enrollment Management at Central Washington University. During this process, transfer evaluators look at the student’s classes and match them with courses at their university. If you’ve taken a class without a match, Archibald says the evaluator will look up the course description, send it to


@CollegeXpress


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