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Scholarships for Transfer Students


You’ll find transfer scholarships offered by individual colleges and universities as well as your home state, so be sure to ask your transfer counselor about the scholarship opportunities that might be available to you! In the meantime, take a look at these national awards.


Community College Transfer Scholarship Program | Hispanic Scholarship Fund Applicant must be a graduating high school senior who is a US citizen or legal permanent resident and of Hispanic heritage. Must be enrolled as a student in a community college and have plans to transfer to a full-time degree-seeking program at a four-year accredited college or university in the United States, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, or Guam.


Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship | Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Awarded based on an assessment of an applicant’s academic achievement, financial need, persistence, leadership, and compassion. Applicants must be a current student or recent graduate from an accredited US community college or two-year institution with sophomore status planning to enroll in a full-time, accredited baccalaureate program. Minimum GPA is 3.5 on a 4.0 scale.


Phi Theta Kappa Scholarships | Phi Theta Kappa Members of the Phi Theta Kappa honor society may be eligible for a number of transfer scholarships. For example, full-time transfer students who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement can win $7,500 (and a commemorative medallion—not too shabby).


then transfer to a university, you can save quite a bit of money.” But just how much? For students attending college in their home state, the average tuition and fees at public two-year institutions are just over $3,000 a year, according to the Na- tional Center for Education Statistics. At four-year public schools, by com- parison, the average is more than $8,700—almost three times as much. And this doesn’t even include room and board, which can add more than $10,000 to the total cost of a year’s attendance. Compared to the costs of private colleges, the difference is even more compelling. Tuition and fees alone average around $40,000 annually, not including food and housing.


Keep in mind that these are aver- ages. Many colleges assess tuition by the credit hour, with overall costs depending on how many courses are taken during a given term. Some com- munity colleges are also substantially less expensive than the average col- lege costs. For example, Glendale Community College’s tuition is $87 per credit hour, or just over $2,000 annually.


Of course, students at community colleges may face other expenses, such as the cost of commuting to and from campus. But even with that expense, starting out at a two-year


school can save you thousands of dollars.


Such a dramatic difference in costs can be a lifesaver for families with fi- nancial challenges. Or, in situations where budget is less of an issue, the savings can be used for other expenses, such as traveling or buying a car. That’s not all. Even after enjoying tremendous savings, you still get the perk of a “name brand” education. If you earn a bachelor’s degree at a prestigious university after complet- ing the first two years at a lesser- known community college, your di- ploma is as valid as those earned by students who started out there as freshmen.


Make it happen If transferring is an option you’d like to explore, you can make it happen. For things to go smoothly, though, careful planning is a must. “The important part is in your find- ing the right schools with strong partnerships and agreements,” says David M. Kaiser, Director of Enroll- ment Management for the Fox School of Business at Temple University. He points out that articulation agree- ments come in different forms. Some are just for the general education or core curriculum classes, while others consist of specific program-to-program agreements in areas such as business,


transfer.collegexpress.com n 2021 15


If tranferring is an option you’d like to explore, you can make it happen. For things to go smoothly, though, careful planning is a must.


liberal arts, or the sciences; still oth- ers may even cover an entire two- year course of study.


For example, students in California


can take advantage of a program called Transfer Admission Guaran- tee. Through this initiative, six cam- puses in the state’s university system offer guaranteed admission to com- munity college students. A similar arrangement is available to students in Minnesota, with the University of Minnesota Twin Cities and seven of the state’s two-year campuses offering the Minnesota Cooperative Admissions Program (MnCAP). Stu- dents who earn an associate degree and meet the program’s requirements are guaranteed transfer admission. While partnerships between col- leges vary, a common denominator is that all schools provide counseling or advising services to help students make academic and career plans. If


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