search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
you apply to see if your scores even need improving as a transfer versus a high school applicant.


Transcripts You’re going to need to send multi- ple transcripts to all your prospec- tive transfer schools. Give your high school a call and have them send over your high school transcript just like they did when you first applied to college. Don’t be afraid to be per- sistent: your former school counselor has a whole new senior class worth of transcripts to send, so yours could easily get lost in the shuffle. Be sure to follow up until you’re absolutely positive that your transcript has ar- rived at all of your institutions of choice.


Additionally, you’ll need to get your transcript from your current col- lege and send that to your prospec- tive transfer schools as well. Usually you can do this at your current school’s registrar. You might need to do this twice—once for your first semester grades, then again for your second semester grades once they come in at the end of the school year. Again, be sure to get your tran- scripts in early during the applica- tion process and continue to check in with all parties to make sure ev- erything is sent and arrives on time. Set up alerts once or twice a week to remind yourself and keep track of all these processes.


GPA


Remember senior year of high school when your second semester grades “didn’t matter that much” because you just had to “pass your classes” to keep your spot in the college you were admitted to? That’s not the case anymore (or then, for that matter). If you transfer after freshman year, your prospective school will only have one semester’s worth of grades to judge your performance and suc- cess as a college student. You’ll want to kick butt that second semester to prove to the transfer school you’ve been admitted to that you can han- dle a more rigorous curriculum.


And don’t wait until finals week in


April to start making those A’s: the schools you’re applying to may also want your midterm grades before deciding whether or not to admit you. That’s right: every grade you put on your transfer application counts. Deciding to transfer means you’ll need to get the best grades you’ve ever received, so make sure you’re ready for that challenge.


Transfer essay


Be prepared to write an essay on why you want to transfer. If you remem- ber your original Common Applica- tion essay, this one will go in place of that and will be sent to schools you apply to the same way. Writing these essays may sound challenging, especially if the reason you want to transfer doesn’t come in a pretty little package. But if you give yourself some time to brainstorm and work only on your transfer es- say, you’ll find your word count met before you know it. Personally, I wrote about how my first college helped me thrive and grow for a season, but because I didn’t feel particularly academically chal- lenged there, I sought new soil. It was all framed with a metaphor involv- ing my seventh-grade basil plant that only lived for one short winter (may she rest in peace).


After you receive your admission decisions


So you applied and got accepted as a transfer student—congrats! Before sending in your deposit, here are a couple more things to consider…


Transfer programs


Some schools are well known for accepting transfer students. For in- stance, when I transferred to the College of William & Mary, I lived in a hall with all transfer students, and we even attended our very own trans- fer orientation.


Even though I went to a transfer- friendly school, the entire experience still felt emotionally taxing. For that reason, make sure you choose a school


transfer.collegexpress.com n 2021 21


where they know how to help transfer students acclimate to their new envi- ronment. Seek out specific programs for transfer students, and look for a high rate of transfer students joining the campus community each year. (I cannot stress how important this is!)


Credits


Having your hard-earned credits from your previous school go to waste is not ideal. Most schools that accept a lot of transfer students make a big effort to ensure that all your credits will transfer and count toward your degree. But what most transfer stu- dents don’t realize is that even if a college accepts all your credits, most of them will only be accepted as electives.


Before I transferred, I knew I want-


ed to major in English, so I took a lot of English classes at my first school. However, at my new school, all those credits only counted as English elec- tives. I had to retake the freshman English seminar and a lot of intro classes at my new school as a result. Luckily all my credits transferred in one way or another, because I probably wouldn’t have transferred if I was going to completely lose them (which can happen, depending on where you transfer to or from). Moral of the story: remember that getting your credits approved to transfer might not mean they trans- fer the way you want them to.


Every school that accepts transfer stu- dents is different: some aren’t on the Common Application, while others have different GPA and transfer ad- mission requirements, financial aid policies, or application deadlines. Research what each of your individ- ual schools needs from you while applying, and get ready to have the best college experience you could ever imagine, even if you took the scenic route to get there. Remember, it’s not where you start—it’s where you end up that counts!


Phoebe Bain is a freelance writer based in New York City.


@CollegeXpress


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172