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high school students, they can still take advantage of college fairs, which are open to high school and college students. Visit the admission page of any four-year college website and they’re likely to have a list of upcom- ing college fairs in the immediate area.


Future transfer students should bring an unofficial college transcript to their college fairs too so when they visit an admission representative’s table, they can present their aca- demic information and get a sense of whether or not they’ll meet the academic criteria for admission. The majority of community col- leges will also hold at least one trans- fer student fair each year. (Many hold two!) By participating in a transfer fair, students will often have the op- portunity to meet the primary trans- fer enrollment representative from a four-year school, and they can begin building a relationship prior to sub- mitting an application for admis- sion. College representatives enjoy getting to meet prospective applicants prior to admission committee re- views, so if the opportunity is there, students should take advantage!


Admission partnerships Many two- and four-year schools have different types of admission agreements to help ease the transfer process for their students. When re- searching colleges, transfers should look out for these commonly used admission opportunities, aka articu- lation agreements, which can greatly assist with the transfer experience.


2+2 articulation agreements Most commonly used as partnership agreements between community col- leges and relatively nearby four-year institutions, these agreements pro- vide specific course requirements for every semester a student is enrolled at the community college. Students who follow the required course plan and complete their associate degree with a specific GPA can then apply to specific four-year schools where they will be guaranteed admission—


TRANSFERRING FROM ONE SCHOOL


TO ANOTHER DOESN’T HAVE TO BE STRESSFUL.


THERE ARE MANY RESOURCES


AVAILABLE TO ALL TYPES OF TRANSFER APPLICANTS.


BUT FOR THE MOST PLEASANT TRANSFER EXPERIENCE,


COMMUNICATION IS KEY.


with all their coursework transfer- ring seamlessly.


3+2 articulation agreements These are often partnerships between two four-year institutions. If one school doesn’t offer a specific major (like Engineering or Nursing), they may create an agreement with an- other school that does offer that program. The student can spend three years of study at one institu- tion, completing specific prerequi- site classes, then transfer to the sec- ond school to complete the required core classes for the specific degree. Ultimately, the student will gradu- ate with two bachelor’s degrees and will have experienced college life at two different four-year schools. These agreements work well for students with a desire to study in two differ- ent parts of their state or those with an eye on reducing their college costs.


Joint admission agreements In rare instances, students accepted to a community college will simul- taneously be granted admission to a specific four-year school. As long as the student completes their two-year degree with a specific cumulative


transfer.collegexpress.com n 2021 23 @CollegeXpress


GPA, they’ll automatically be grant- ed an acceptance to the four-year institution.


Guaranteed admission agreements Guaranteed agreements are similar to 2+2 articulation agreements, but they won’t provide a specific degree plan while a student is enrolled at the community college. Instead, these agreements will often refer the stu- dent to the community college cur- riculum for degree completion and will then require that they take one or two additional courses in order to transfer to the four-year school with junior standing.


Transferring from one school to an- other doesn’t have to be stressful. There are many resources available to all types of transfer applicants. But for the most pleasant transfer expe- rience, communication is key. The more students ask questions of advi- sors and transfer admission person- nel, the easier the transition will be and the more knowledgeable they’ll become about varied opportunities and processes. Students can get the support they need to go through the transfer experience from beginning to end, one school to another.


Troy Cogburn is the Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia.


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