search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
M


anhattan College is an inde- pendent, private Lasallian Catholic institution of high- er learning that embraces qualified men and women of all faiths, races, and ethnic backgrounds, whether they are beginning as freshmen or transferring. Established in 1853, the College was founded upon the Lasal- lian traditions of excellence in teach- ing, respect for individual dignity, and commitment to social justice inspired by the innovator of modern peda- gogy, Saint John Baptist de La Salle. Students come to Manhattan from all walks of life. What connects them is their decision to make a smart in- vestment in the future. Manhattan College pairs personalized educa- tion with big-city opportunity. It is consistently ranked as a college that provides the best return on investment.


At Manhattan, an admission coun-


selor is dedicated to transfer students to make the transition smooth and easy. Students can have their unique needs met all in one place while ex- ploring the many opportunities on campus. The credit evaluation pro-


cess is also done in a timely manner so transfers can begin as quickly as possible.


A heritage of excellence With over 160 years of history, the College is at the forefront of out- standing comprehensive colleges. Through the years, one constant has guided the College—the Lasallian Catholic heritage upon which it was built. Christian Brothers and lay teachers alike have educated gen- erations of leaders with programs in the liberal arts, business, educa- tion and health, engineering, and the sciences and nearly 50 major fields of study for virtually any cho- sen profession.


Social justice in action Following in de La Salle’s footsteps, Manhattan College students active- ly define their commitment to so- cial justice by trading their tradition- al lifestyles for immersion and service experiences around the city, country, and world. Each year, Campus Ministry and Social Action (CMSA) runs its L.O.V.E.


transfer.collegexpress.com n 2021 42


program (Lasallian Outreach Volun- teer Experience), which gives students the chance to travel to some of the world’s poorest areas in New Orleans, Kenya, Ecuador, the Dominican Re- public, and West Virginia to volun- teer with people of different socio- economic backgrounds.


Closer to home, students involved in the Lasallian Outreach Collab- orative (L.O.Co.) participate in ongo- ing, sustainable weekly service work throughout the year with various lo- cal community organizations, work- ing to create lasting social change by responding to the expressed needs of the College’s community partners.


A campus to call home The tight-knit College community is composed of over 4,000 students. With a 12:1 student-faculty ratio, our professors know students per- sonally and care about their suc- cess. The majority of students live on our traditional collegiate cam- pus, which is just a subway ride from the city center. In addition, many students take advantage of the College’s New York City location


@CollegeXpress


NORTHEAST


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172