search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Coronavirus May Change the


How the


Transfer Process


BY JOANNA NESBIT I


f you’re planning to transfer col- leges, the ongoing coronavirus pandemic will likely add (or al- ready has added) a layer of con- siderations and stressors to the transfer admission process. College experts say the most important thing a transfer student—or any student— can do is plan to be fl exible, and col- leges are doing everything they can to help students navigate this unchart- ed territory. Here’s what you should know about the transfer process dur- ing the coronavirus pandemic.


Campuses may look different Every campus is handling this situa- tion differently, but many schools are maintaining a blend of remote, hy- brid, and in-person classes, knowing that if the school has a concentrated outbreak, courses could easily be shift- ed entirely online. In this new cam- pus environment, you might be re- quired to get tested for COVID-19, wear a face mask, follow social dis- tancing guidelines, and/or participate in contact tracing. If you plan to live


off campus and take remote classes only, getting connected to your new school may feel trickier, but it will be important for a successful transition.


To get connected, reach out for campus services Campus offi cials want to help you, but as a prospective transfer student, you should take the initiative to reach out yourself. “Don’t be afraid to ask questions,” says Bradley Brooks, a success coach for the ADVANCE Transfer Partnership program between Northern Virginia Community Col- lege and George Mason University. Erin Mulvey, Transfer Transitions Co- ordinator at Oregon State University, suggests tapping into campus re- sources to start making connections. Begin creating these important rela- tionships with your new professors, residence hall staff, and cultural re- source centers—even if you’re limit- ed to only virtual communication. If you’re not sure where to start,


talk to your academic advisor. Your question might be as simple as “How


transfer.collegexpress.com  2021 8


do I join a remote study group?” but your advisor can point you in the right direction. For example, OSU’s Academic Success Center has a Learn- ing Corner with many virtual docu- ments about being a successful stu- dent, including Zoom tips for creating remote group study sessions. Con- necting with your new peers is im- portant for your adjustment, even if it’s through a virtual platform. Also fi nd ways to create account- ability systems to stay engaged with your online classes. Brooks recom- mends regular email check-ins with professors, attending virtual offi ce hours, and frequent virtual meetings with a success coach or academic ad- visor. Brooks meets with students for virtual weekly check-ins and helps them fi gure out how to create con- nections with the institution to cul- tivate a sense of belonging—which is especially important during online- only operations. Even if your college doesn’t require you to meet with an academic advisor every semester, you should do it anyway. Your advisor


@CollegeXpress


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172